Posts

Will Bernardara Jr - Simultaneously a novella of stunning and sudden hyperviolence, an all-too-brief examination of cultural, pharmacological, and emotional dis-ease and disturbance, and a comprehensive demonological treatise

Image
Will Bernardara Jr, America, Void Front Press, 2018.


Simultaneously a novella of stunning and sudden hyperviolence, an all-too-brief examination of cultural, pharmacological, and emotional dis-ease and disturbance, and a comprehensive demonological treatise. Unsettling, unnerving, an image of multiply-entwined unravelings, Bernardara Jr invokes the superimposed spectres of America’s favorite pastimes: brutal violence, desensitization, and ignorance of the consequences of both.


//The evil is a plague and it is bacterial but its
vector is consciousness. The writer does not know or
comprehend the specifics of these future realities. At
any rate, what we have is possession by an external
force that looks like demonic possession (and it is)
and culminates in violent crimes, death, and assorted
nastiness.


“Fucking sorry –”
Dad twists, throws a right hook. Adam’s vision goes night.//

Ignacio Matte Blanco hypothesized the nature of unconscious logic, as opposed to conscious logic. He deduced that if the unconscious has consistent characteristics it must follow rules, or there would be chaos. However the nature of these hypothetical characteristics indicates that their rules differ from conventional logic.

Image
Ignacio Matte Blanco, The Unconscious as Infinite Sets: An Essay in Bi-logic, Routledge, 1981.
read it at google Books


A systematic effort to rethink Freud's theory of the unconscious, aiming to separate out the different forms of unconsciousness. The logico-mathematical treatment of the subject is made easy because every concept used is simple and simply explained from first principles. Each renewed explanation of the facts brings the emergence of new knowledge from old material of truly great importance to the clinician and the theorist alike. A highly original book that ought to be read by everyone interested in psychiatry or in Freudian psychology.


'Perhaps the first systematic effort to rethink Freud's theory of the unconscious, aiming to separate the different forms of unconsciousness (many of which Freud lumped into the concept of the "primary process") has been undertaken by Ignacio Matte Blanco in The Unconscious as Infinite Sets. Matte Blanco's work is…

Maria Mitsora - Moving across the urban netherworld of Athens to imagined Latin American towns and science-fiction dystopias, Mitsora animates the alternatingly dark and revelatory aspects of the human psyche, depicting a world in which her protagonists are caught between reality and myth, predestination and chance, rationality and twisted dreams.

Image
Maria Mitsora, On My Aunt’s Shallow Grave White Roses Have Already Bloomed, Trans. by Jacob Moe, Yale University Press, 2018.


read it at Google Books


A collection of short stories by an acclaimed contemporary Greek writer, reminiscent of Lydia Davis and Jenny Offill

This collection assembles sixteen of Maria Mitsora’s short stories in what adds up to be a retrospective of the author’s work, spanning forty years. Moving across the urban netherworld of Athens to imagined Latin American towns and science-fiction dystopias, Mitsora animates the alternatingly dark and revelatory aspects of the human psyche, depicting a world in which her protagonists are caught between reality and myth, predestination and chance, rationality and twisted dreams. 
Mitsora led a generation of writers whose work articulated major transitions in the Greek literary scene, from 1970s historical and political sensibilities shaped in response to the military Junta to a contemporary focus on a fragmented, multicultura…

Thomas R. H. Havens - the first book in any language to discuss Japan’s avant-garde artists, their work, and the historical environment in which they produced it during the two most creative decades of the twentieth century, the 1950s and 1960s

Image
Thomas R. H. Havens, Radicals And Realists in the Japanese Nonverbal Arts: The Avant-garde, University of Hawaii Press, 2006.


read it at Google Books


Radicals and Realists is the first book in any language to discuss Japan’s avant-garde artists, their work, and the historical environment in which they produced it during the two most creative decades of the twentieth century, the 1950s and 1960s. Many of the artists were radicals, rebelling against existing canons and established authority. Yet at the same time they were realists in choosing concrete materials, sounds, and themes from everyday life for their art and in gradually adopting tactics of protest or resistance through accommodation rather than confrontation. Whatever the means of expression, the production of art was never devoid of historical context or political implication. Focusing on the nonverbal genres of painting, sculpture, dance choreography, and music composition, this work shows that generational and political diffe…

Georges Limbour - It is an odd fiction, rich in energy and full of partly resolved conflicts. There is a great note of enthusiasm and sensual delight running through it, yet the verbal effervescence is always tempered by intelligence

Image
Georges Limbour
http://www.georgeslimbour.org/
Three récits by Georges Limbour




Michel Leiris, writing in Atoll in 1968, described the writer Georges Limbour as: ‘a great poet in every heart-beat of what he wrote, but a poet without fanfare or vain display’. In ‘a society less gross than ours’ Leiris went on to say, Limbour would have had a far larger following. Limbour was greatly admired by his contemporaries, many of whom he knew as friends, including Max Jacob, Jean Cocteau, George Bataille, and Raymond Queneau. But very little of his work has been translated into English, and even in France he is not widely known. He was born in 1900 and grew up in and around Le Havre. His childhood friends included the painter Jean Dubuffet, and Raymond Queneau. He started writing in his teens. Aged 18 he went to Paris to study medicine, then switched to philosophy. But he spent more time in literary circles than with his text books, drawn to both André Breton’s Surrealist group, and the experiment…

Beatriz Bracher depicts a life where the temperature is lower, there is no music, and much is out of view. I Didn't Talk's pariah’s-eye-view of the forgotten “small” victims powerfully bears witness to their “internal exile”

Image
Beatriz Bracher, I Didn't TalkTrans. by Adam Morris, New Directions, 2018.


The English-language debut of a master stylist: a compassionate but relentless novel about the long, dark harvest of Brazil’s totalitarian rule 
A professor prepares to retire―Gustavo is set to move from Sao Paulo to the countryside, but it isn’t the urban violence he’s fleeing: what he fears most is the violence of his memory. But as he sorts out his papers, the ghosts arrive in full force. He was arrested in 1970 with his brother-in-law Armando: both were vicariously tortured. He was eventually released; Armando was killed. No one is certain that he didn’t turn traitor: I didn’t talk, he tells himself, yet guilt is his lifelong harvest. I Didn’t Talk pits everyone against the protagonist―especially his own brother. The torture never ends, despite his bones having healed and his teeth having been replaced. And to make matters worse, certain details from his shattered memory don’t quite add up... Beatriz B…