Posts

Showing posts from September, 2014

Spencer Madsen - His writing helps clarify our complicated and subjective world into one of simple truths. His poetry is both heartbreaking and heart mending

Image
Spencer Madsen, You Can Make Anything Sad, Publishing Genius Press, 2014.


“When I read Spencer Madsen’s poetry, I not only feel awe because he’s so good, one of the best, but I also think about how everything in the world is happening at the same time, and how the world we get to know is so heavily edited down. It’s the hugest, weirdest feeling. I wish Spencer Madsen could be everywhere at once. I really love You Can Make Anything Sad.” — Dennis Cooper
“If I had published this I would’ve cut the ‘dick like Gogurt’ line.” -Giancarlo DiTrapano

Madsen’s poetry has always been, to me, staggeringly honest. His writing helps clarify our complicated and subjective world into one of simple truths. His poetry is both heartbreaking and heart mending. Madsen’s work is important. This book will be important.—Rhys Nixon
Spencer Madsen’s You Can Make Anything Sad is filled with movement, mortality, and masturbation. Natural disaster intervenes young love. Everyone leaves. Frozen pancakes are peeled…

Philippe Soupault - A haunting depiction of a world in which the characters find themselves both the ghosts and the spooked

Image
Philippe Soupault, Last Nights of Paris.Translated by William Carlos Williams, Exact Change; Reprint edition, 2008. [1928.]

Written in 1928 by one of the founders of the Surrealist movement, and translated the following year by William Carlos Williams (the two had been introduced in Paris by a mutual friend), Last Nights of Paris is related to Surrealist novels such as Nadja and Paris Peasant, but also to the American expatriate novels of its day such as Day of the Locust. The story concerns the narrator’s obsession with a woman who leads him into an underworld that promises to reveal the secrets of the city itself… and in Williams’ wonderfully direct translation it reads like a lost Great American Novel. A vivid portrait of the city that entranced both its native writers and the Americans who traveled to it in the twenties, Last Nights of Paris is a rare collaboration between the literary circles at the root of both French and American modernism.

“Soupault’s nocturnal ramblings inclu…

Mark von Schlegell invented his peculiar brand of ficto-criticism and philosophical pulp fiction by publishing almost exclusively in the international art world, putting its global commitment to avant-garde experiment, futurist visions and amateur left-wing agitation to the service of radical speculative fiction

Image
Mark von Schlegell, Ickles, Etc., Sternberg Press, 2014.

Edited by Nikolaus Hirsch, Markus Miessen
Featuring artwork by Louise Lawler

Website: http://www.sff.net/people/schlegell
Facebook: Facebook profile
Blog: http://dreamingthemainstream.tumblr.com/

It’s the late twenty-first century. Technological, environmental, and social catastrophes have changed the meanings of culture, nature, and landscape forever. But in what remains of the international urban scene, architecture still refuses to admit it hasn’t been modern since the early twentieth century. Enter Ickles, Etc.
Helming Los Angeles’s most misunderstood info-architecture practice is Henries Ickles, “the man without self-concept.” Time and again Ickles offers practical solutions to the most impenetrable theoretical entanglements of art, architecture, and science in the 2090s.
In the fifth book in the Critical Spatial Practice series, Mark von Schlegell’s fusion of theory and fiction puts the SF ba…

Hito Steyerl - Twisting the politics of representation around the representation of politics, these essays uncover a rich trove of information in the formal shifts and aberrant distortions of accelerated capitalism, of the art system as a vast mine of labor extraction and passionate commitment

Image
Hito Steyerl, The Wretched of the Screen, Sternberg Press, 2012.    download (pdf)
In Hito Steyerl’s writing we begin to see how, even if the hopes and desires for coherent collective political projects have been displaced onto images and screens, it is precisely here that we must look frankly at the technology that seals them in. The Wretched of the Screen collects a number of Steyerl’s landmark essays from recent years in which she has steadily developed her very own politics of the image.
Twisting the politics of representation around the representation of politics, these essays uncover a rich trove of information in the formal shifts and aberrant distortions of accelerated capitalism, of the art system as a vast mine of labor extraction and passionate commitment, of occupation and internship, of structural and literal violence, enchantment and fun, of hysterical, uncontrollable flight through the wreckage of postcolonial and modernist discourses and their unanticipat…

Laura Ellen Joyce considers the ongoing brutality of the femicides in Ciudad Juarez and the institutional misogyny of the Catholic Church. She finds the blue-glowing, b-movie heart of Plath’s and Ballard’s atrocity exhibitions and the parapornography of reliquaries

Image
Laura Ellen Joyce, The Luminol Reels, Calamari Press, 2014.excerpt & interview in The Collagist


When human blood reacts with luminol, it lights up a ghostly blue. This reaction, most commonly used to detect whether violence has taken place at suspected crime scenes, combines the human and the chemical, it invokes violence and disposability but also transformation. THE LUMINOL REELS takes its imagery from pornography, Catholicism, and crime scene investigation to interrogate the violence done to women. It considers the ongoing brutality of the femicides in Ciudad Juarez and the institutional misogyny of the Catholic Church. Violence is intrinsically linked to location, and the shrines, quinceañera parties, holy communions, and seances of this book are all stained luminescent blue.


«A fierce and deadly little fantasia that bites its way deep into your brain.»—Brian Evenson
«"We were plump and pretty, our skin glowed like Chinese lanterns and he wanted our laughter for himself&q…