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Showing posts from February, 2018

Elytron Frass - a hypnotic flow of morbid visions of violence and sexuality that sometimes read like Comte De Lautreamont, sometimes like 80s horror cult classics, and, most curiously, often like beautiful lyrical poems, in which the poet is not ‘man speaking to men’ but a conjurer of ghosts”

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Elytron Frass. Liber Exuvia, gnOme, 2018.
An interactive grimoire devoted to the sundry incarnations of a self-beheading mantis, Liber Exuvia provides a shadow of insight into its author by way of past-life regressions and encrypted charms. What was once crudely printed and mass-mailed to random households all across the globe—Elytron Frass’s confrontational novella is now bound, barcoded, and available to any daring reader.
Liber Exuvia presents a hypnotic flow of morbid visions of violence and sexuality that sometimes read like Comte De Lautreamont, sometimes like 80s horror cult classics, and, most curiously, often like beautiful lyrical poems, in which the poet is not ‘man speaking to men’ but a conjurer of ghosts.” — Johannes Göransson
“Reading Frass’s work is the taking-in of a great breath and holding it, stretching it to every seam, hallucinating as you beg for air, and falling into a gentle death-lull of captivation. You will travel to another world, many of them. You will leave…

Carlos Busqued - Equal parts stoner pulp thriller and psycho-physiological horror story, a pervasive sense of dread mixes with a cloud of weed smoke to seep into every line of the disturbing, complex Under This Terrible Sun

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Carlos Busqued, Under This Terrible Sun, Trans. by Megan McDowell, Frisch and Co. 2013.read it at Google BooksA stoner travels to remote Argentina to identify the bodies of his murdered mother and brother. What could possibly go wrong?Cetarti spends his days in a cloud of pot smoke, watching nature documentaries on television. He is torn from his lethargy by a call informing him that his mother and brother have been murdered, and that he must identify the bodies.
After making sure he has enough weed for the trip, he sets out to the remote Argentinian village of Lapachito, an ominous place where the houses are sinking deeper and deeper into the mud and a lurid, horrific sun is driving everyone crazy. When Duarte, a former military man turned dedicated criminal, ropes Cetarti into a scheme to cash in on his mother’s life insurance, events quickly spiral out of control…


A riveting, thrilling, and shocking read, Under This Terrible Sun paints the portrait of a civilizational in terminal dec…

Sharon Dodua Otoo - The protagonist Cee is suddenly confronted with fundamental changes in her (experience of) life: one by one each colour disappears from her daily routine. As she tries to find a way to deal with this, she is forced to question her deepest held convictions

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Sharon Dodua Otoo,  Synchronicity, Edition Assemblage, 2015. www.sharonotoo.com


One day, Cee realises that she is in the process of losing her colours – which is definitely bad enough. But actually – it‘s just the beginning…
Cee slowly realises that she is losing her colours day by day. Of course, this worries her at first – although she already knows that her foremothers also went through it and survived. Still. Now she has to once again learn how to deal with loss – and just like last time, it‘s happening just before Christmas…


Reading this work by Otoo is at once swift and gentle: as if you were holding a butterfly cupped between your hands. This describes exactly how I felt as I held the main character of “Synchronicity“, with all her experiences, in my hands. It was as if she wanted to break out, to escape from everything which she was in danger of sliding and disappearing into. Or was it actually the others who make and made her increasingly colourless or even completely invisibl…

Patricia Eakins - A stunning mixture of mythology, surrealism, anthropology and nature. These stories are a modern bestiary which rework the stuff of mythologies, spanning the cultures of the planet, reclaiming for the Imagination its territories from Science

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Patricia Eakins, Hungry Girls and Other Stories, Cadmus Editions, 1989.


The title story won a Charles Angoff award in 1987 and this collection of thirteen connected stories, Eakins' first book, announces a new talent on the scene. As Paul Violi observes, “Eakins' work has the multifarious appeal of genius, and she may have written a major book. Certainly she has written a magical one.” These stories are a modern bestiary which rework the stuff of mythologies, spanning the cultures of the planet, reclaiming for the Imagination its territories from Science. They are counterfables in which the usual fabulous project is reversed: animal characteristics are attributed to humans, and humans and animals are seen as codeterminants of the moral and cultural landscape.

Eakins writes of terrifying pullulation [rapid breeding, swarming, teeming] with enormous charm; nature in her stories is gargantuan and omnivorous . . . life is a constant turmoil of metamorphoses, Heraclitian but marv…