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Anne Garréta - a remarkable work of literary ingenuity: a beautiful and complex love story between two characters, the narrator, “I,” and “A***,” written completely without any gendered pronouns or gender markers referring to the main characters. The first work by a female Oulipian published in English.

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Anne Garréta, Sphinx. Trans. byGeorge Henson, Deep Vellum,
2015.


excerpt 1 and excerpt 2

A debut novel, originally published in 1986, by the incredibly talented and inventive French author Anne Garréta, one of the few female members of OuLiPo, the influential and exclusive French experimental literary group whose mission is to create literature based on mathematical and linguistic restraints, and whose ranks include Georges Perec, Italo Calvino, and Raymond Queneau, among others. Sphinx is a remarkable work of literary ingenuity: a beautiful and complex love story between two characters, the narrator, “I,” and “A***,” written completely without any gendered pronouns or gender markers referring to the main characters. Sphinx is not only the first novel by Garréta to appear in English but the first work by a female Oulipian published in English.






In outline Sphinx is a conventional sort of novel: from a point a decade or so after its beginnings, a narrator reflects on an early p…

Róbert Gál - On Wing is atomized into hundreds of tiny aphorisms, dreams, anecdotes, and inquiries, while Agnomia is a long block of seemingly chaotic prose taking its structural cues from--and culminating in the description of a concert by--the renowned saxophonist and composer John Zorn

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Róbert Gál, On Wing. Trans. by Mark Kanak. Dalkey Archive Press, 2015.
The volume brings together the great Slovak philosopher/poet Róbert Gál's two works of fiction, Agnomia and On Wing, though they are by no means ordinary novellas. On Wing is atomized into hundreds of tiny aphorisms, dreams, anecdotes, and inquiries, while Agnomia is a long block of seemingly chaotic prose taking its structural cues from--and culminating in the description of a concert by--the renowned saxophonist and composer John Zorn.


“The Czech Cioran …” —Andrei Codrescu


“Gál’s aphorisms combine incisive question-raising and gently troubling images involving Time, God … and existential self-awareness.” —The Antioch Review
“Gál is a phenomenon unto himself: a purveyor of neurotic philosophy encapsulated in elliptical portents and epifragmentals, the content of which is at all odds with their length.” —Joshua Cohen




“There’s a degree of destitution when the mind doesn’t always stay with the body. It’s too…