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Showing posts from October, 2016

B. R. Yeager - Genocidal businessmen. Apocalyptic visions. CGI-coated violence. Teenage follies. B.R. Yeager’s poetry collection Worlds of Ruin explores the role of violence in pop culture and modern society with frenetic energy and staggering lyricism

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B. R. Yeager, Worlds of Ruin, Five Quarterly, 2015.




Click here to read WORLDS OF RUIN
bryeager.wordpress.com/


When one plays a game, they inhabit what Johan Huizinga refers to as the ‘Magic Circle’–a world that exists with its own set of rules that the gamer must abide by. Worlds of Ruin is an experiment in what happens when that circle is broken: the quest-like nature and the brutality of the grind seeps into our every day lives in ways we don’t always expect. However, beyond the rubble, some magic has also found its way here, too. - Brian Oliu
Open doors and descend. No pause. Just repeat. B.R. Yeager’s Worlds of Ruin delivers blood, dirt, bodies, infected desires, un-pretty things that gleam darkly, unexpectedly. This is a landscape of bodily fluids and fears painted in muted palettes and anti-heroes who find only the tiniest moments of respite and victory. Read this book as if it were a video game — keep playing and when you get to the end, begin again. - Georgia Bellas

Praise from Ne…

John Colasacco is equal parts savant, madman, and humanist. The fiction he writes for the page may very well be the biographies of individuals from a parallel universe. Colasacco is channeling something utterly unique and it would be foolish of you not heed his words

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John Colasacco,  Two Teenagers, Horse Less Press, 2016.

"I like this book a lot. I found a lot of surprises in the way the sentences worked. I was taken down a path cognitively and then thrust into a situation that made me use my psychedelic brain. I like being asked to do that. TWO TEENAGERS seeks the dust and doorways that evoke emotive meaning. Each sentence unfolds new emotions through a kind of paced, unique, symbolic logic. Measurable phenomena + the liquid in which the answer skinny dips. Verificationism + a tree that survives on echoes. This book is full of feelings I'd forgotten I'd had."—Sommer Browning


You can read some excerpts from TWO TEENAGERS at Tarpaulin Sky  +
www.nightblockmag.com/colasacco/
www.birdfeastmagazine.com/eleven/colasacco.html
www.cosmonautsavenue.com/four-poems-by-john-colasacco/

Excerpts:
Two teenagers turn around quickly expecting to see blue sparks or a person walking toward a house in an open field.
The rest of the day moves slowly while …

Marc Anthony Richardson has found a way to describe in words the inability to understand other people—he uses dense prose that circles on itself and leaps from present to flashback, depicting a muddled mind at work

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Marc Anthony Richardson, Year of the Rat, Fiction Collective 2, 2016.
excerpt
read it at Google Books
www.marcanthonyrichardson.com/


Winner of the FC2 Ronald Sukenick Innovative Fiction Prize
In Year of the Rat, an artist returns to the dystopian city of his birth to tend to his invalid mother only to find himself torn apart by memories and longings. Narrated by this nameless figure whose rants, reveries, and Rabelaisian escapades take him on a Dantesque descent into himself, the story follows him and his mother as they share a one-bedroom apartment over the course of a year.
Despite his mother’s precarious health, the lingering memories of a lost love, an incarcerated sibling, a repressed sexuality, and an anarchic inability to support himself, he pursues his dream of becoming an avant-garde artist. His prospects grow dim until a devastating death provides a painful and unforeseeable opportunity. With a voice that is poetic and profane, ethereal and irreverent, cyclical and succinct, he ro…

Ádám Lovász - a wonderful mashup of critique and mysticism, deconstruction and speculative realism. It's like Dialectic of Enlightenment on bad acid and crammed with scientific research

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Márk Horváth and Ádám Lovász,The Isle of Lazaretto, Schism Press, 2016.


twitter.com/AdamRefuter


Books are there to amaze us: Márk Horváth and Ádám Lovász have certainly done that. I'm not sure I've read a more paranoiacally invigorating and inclusive text since Negarestani’s Cyclonopedia. This book is a wonderful mashup of critique and mysticism, deconstruction and speculative realism. It's like Dialectic of Enlightenment on bad acid and crammed with scientific research. The reach of scholarship in here amazes me: we’ve got OOO and Deleuze, but we also have Lyotard and Irigaray and Blanchot. This book is an invaluable polemic against the idea that breaking down the boundaries between things is always best. Global warming is doing an excellent job of reducing the “islands of ice” (the icebergs) to their oceanic environments. Is that good?– Timothy Morton


This book exhibits the beauty of a random encounter between a sewing machine and an umbrella on a dissection table; it is c…

Lauren Hilger - a masterful expose of filmic proportions. In each poem is a film beckoning to be viewed, emotional resonance pulling you in for a full embrace

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Lauren Hilger, Lady Be Good,Civil Coping Mechanisms, 2016.
laurenhilger.com/

Lauren Hilger’s debut is a masterful expose of filmic proportions. In each poem is a film beckoning to be viewed, emotional resonance pulling you in for a full embrace. Lady Be Good is a delight and declares Hilger as an important voice in contemporary poetry.
The Damascus Room Against the ear a message from one world,
the cold of another, everything lit lurid by
skilled craftsmen. During the day, the escalators keep moving for no one. There remains that list of the last

things in the life of Prince Nikolay Bolkonsky.
Chapter 6 of The Last Tycoon.
Every other page not seen
in the book on display at the museum.

There was a message unmuted,
uninjured, talisman, all ivory hilt,
all of that paper, that manmade
tile, the window.

A seat for everyone— let’s just meet here again.
POETRY “Palinode“, Blackbird“The Dark Ages”, Massachusetts Review “Monk’s Dream”,Literary Orphans“As Tolstoy’s Natasha on the Hunt”, Berkeley Poetry Revi…

Larissa Pham - a meditation on power and the self, in addition to being an erotic thriller

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Larissa Pham, Fantasian, Badlands Unlimited, 2016.


larissapham.com/


An unnamed narrator’s life at Yale takes a dizzying turn when she meets a girl who looks just like her. Drawn into each other’s social worlds, they spiral deeper and deeper into a house of mirrors made of each other.


A young Asian woman's life at Yale takes a dizzying turn when she meets Dolores—her doppelgänger—at a party. As they begin to merge into each other’s social and sexual worlds, it becomes impossible to tell where one girl ends and the other begins. When Dolores' boyfriend and his twin brother enter into this pas de deux, identities and couplings spin off into a sinister and perverse web of illusions. Fantasian is Single White Female for the dawn of a new sexual fluidity.


Fantasian by Larissa Pham is one of the New Lovers, a series of short erotic fiction published by Badlands Unlimited. Inspired by Maurice Girodias’ legendary Olympia Press, New Lovers features the raw and uncut writings of authors ne…

Jen George - Combining slapstick, surrealism, erotica, and social criticism, Jen George's sprawling creative energy belies the secret precision and unexpected tenderness of everything she writes

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Jen George, The Babysitter at Rest, Dorothy, 2016.


 Five stories—several as long as novellas—introduce the world to Jen George, a writer whose furiously imaginative new voice calls to mind Donald Barthelme and Leonora Carrington no less than Kathy Acker and Chris Kraus. In "Guidance/The Party," an ethereal alcoholic "Guide" in robes and flowing hair appears to help a thirty- three-year-old woman prepare a party for her belated adulthood; "Take Care of Me Forever" tragically lambasts the medical profession as a ship of fools afloat in loneliness and narcissism; "Instruction" chronicles a season in an unconventional art school called The Warehouse, where students divide their time between orgies, art critiques, and burying dead racehorses. Combining slapstick, surrealism, erotica, and social criticism, Jen George's sprawling creative energy belies the secret precision and unexpected tenderness of everything she writes.

"I had to judge a s…