Isabel Waidner - Gaudy Bauble stages a glittering world populated by Gilbert & George-like lesbians, GoldSeXUal StatuEttes, anti-drag kings, maverick detectives, a transgender army equipped with question-mark-shaped helmets, and pets who have dyke written all over them. Everyone interferes with the plot. No one is in control of the plot

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Isabel Waidner, Gaudy Bauble, Dostoyevsky Wannabe, 2017.  




"I'm besotted with this beguiling, hilarious, rollocking, language-metamorphosing novel. The future of the queer avant-garde is safe with Isabel Waidner." - Olivia Laing


Gaudy Bauble stages a glittering world populated by Gilbert & George-like lesbians, GoldSeXUal StatuEttes, anti-drag kings, maverick detectives, a transgender army equipped with question-mark-shaped helmets, and pets who have dyke written all over them. Everyone interferes with the plot. No one is in control of the plot. Surprises happen as a matter of course: A faux research process produces actual results. A digital experiment goes viral. Hundreds of lipstick marks requicken a dying body. And the Deadwood-to-Dynamo Audience Prize goes to whoever turns deadestwood into dynamost. Gaudy Bauble stages what happens when the disenfranchised are calling the shots. Riff-raff are running the show and they are making a difference.














trailer:

















Isabel Waidner, Frantisek Flounders: a novella and prequel to Bubka, 8fold 
     
Admittedly Frantisek was angling when the flounder descended on her. That isn't to say that she caught the flounder, pulled the petal or plucked the blossom; she'd categorically speaking lost her pluck, she'd been without pluck for the longest time, and still didn't catch on, didn't catch on the day, couldn't have pulled a petal nor plucked a blossom and certainly not one of the magnitude; Said blossom must have been preying on her - a pining petal, a looming bloom - no other approach gets to the bottom of it, it was the flounder personally, who caught Frantisek out. Giving credit where credit is due, vupti!, the flounder leapt into her lap.










Isabel Waidner, Bubka, 1st Instalment, 8fold, 2010.

the mythical chapter Pelican Pilot appears as an accidental insert in some of the editions.

A deceptively slim volume, Bubka, The 1st Instalment creates a whole world, condensed to the size of a marble. Scrupulously adhering to an unorthodox logic, the plot revolves around spheres and circles, before, via triangles, spiralling out of control. The character Bubka, proprietor of a kiosk, and her customer Gotterbarm are beleaguered by what appears to be a group of aspiring actors, who mimic them to a more or less faithful degree. The ensuing episodes add up to an excess layer of symbolism, a non-verbal metalanguage, which not only threatens to take over the narrative of Bubka and Gotterbarm, but in return asks to be deciphered…
The novel Bubka is published by 8fold as a serialisation. Isabel Waidner is a writer based in London 

Bubka was launched as part of prologue







Isabel Waidner's Camp Crystal (2017) is published by Queen Mob, New Romantic & Tender Hearts (2016) is published at Berfrois, Fantômas Takes Sutton (2016) is published at 3:AM Magazine, and Avant-Ice (2016) is published at Minor Literature[s]. She contributed to the Dictionary of Lost Languages (2015) alongside Sarah Wood, Ali Smith, and Olivia Laing. As part of the Indie band Klang, she released records on UK labels Rough Trade (2003) and Blast First (2004). Waidner co-edits T.A.M. (an underground lit journal). She teaches at Goldsmiths (University of London) and Roehampton University. www.waidner.org @isabelwaidner

http://sarahwoodworld.com/projects_06.html
http://www.blastfirstpetite.com/klangnosoundisheard.html

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