Kit Poulson - Three characters freed from the flow of causality, inter-twine through the experience of conversation. Evoking the writings of Malevich and Schwitters with the pastoral moments of Traffic and the ventriloquised insanity of Little Richard, history is revealed as a flow of conversations as they chance upon precious artefacts, all shaped by the fluid crystalline structure of the most delicious of desserts, ice cream

Kit Poulson, The Ice Cream Empire, Book Works, 2012.


"An experimental narrative, in which three characters freed from the flow of causality, inter-twine through the experience of conversation. Arguing that building is not a structure but an activity of thought – less concrete, more porridge – the Alien Architect encounters the Persistent Midwife, fucked-off with toyshop utopias and declaring herself a suspension – an Ice Cream Empress – and Lou Loa, perhaps the most difficult to understand, not least, or in part, because he claimed to have been present at the creation of the White Horse of Uffington, and to hold the stuff of his being in a leaky bucket of black ink.
Evoking the writings of Malevich and Schwitters with the pastoral moments of Traffic and the ventriloquised insanity of Little Richard, history is revealed as a flow of conversations as they chance upon precious artefacts, all shaped by the fluid crystalline structure of the most delicious of desserts, ice cream.
Ice Cream Empire is commissioned as part of The Time Machine, selected and edited by Francesco Pedraglio from open submission. The Time Machine is a project that asks us to forget about archives and embrace the confusion of the present, in order to consciously experiment with all our imaginable histories and expected futures.
Kit Poulson is an artist working in London."

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