' A Night at the Nabokov Hotel: 20 Contemporary Poets from Russia' seeks to capture the frustration, the suppressed ambitions and the hidden energy of several generations of poets



20 Contemporary Poets from Russia, Ed. by Anatoly Kudryavitsky, Dedalus Press, 2006.




This bilingual anthology seeks to capture the frustration, the suppressed ambitions and the hidden energy of several generations of poets, ranging from those who endured the Communist regime to those who began writing in an almost unrecognizably changed Russia of more recent times.


A Night in the Nabokov Hotel: 20 Contemporary Russian Poets is a major bilingual anthology of contemporary poetry from Russia. Translated and edited by Anatoly Kudryavitsky, it "seeks to capture the frustration, the suppressed ambitions and the hidden energy of several generations of poets, ranging from those who endured the Communist regime, with its strict censorship, to those who began writing in the almost unrecognisably changed Russia of more recent times." The anthology features a selection of work by 20 poets: Gennady Aigi, Ivan Akhmetiev, Gennady Alexeyev, Vladimir Aristov, Sergei Birykuov, Vladimir Earle, Dmitri Grigoriev, Elena Katsuba, Konstantin Kedrov, Igor Kholin, Victor Krivulin, Anatoly Kudryavitsky, Alexander Makarov-Krotkov, Arvo Mets, Vsevolod Nekrasov, Rea Nikonova, Genrikh Sapgir, Asya Shneiderman, Sergey Stratanovsky and Alina Vitukhnovskaya.

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