Reginald Ullmann - Resonant of nineteenth-century village tales and of such authors as Adalbert Stifter and her contemporary Robert Walser, the stories in The Country Road are largely set in the Swiss countryside. In these tales, the archaic and the modern collide




Reginald Ullmann, The Country Road, Trans. by Kurt Beals. New Directions, 2015.




Lauded by Hesse, Rilke, Musil, and Mann, this is the first book to appear in English by the unique Swiss modernist Regina Ullmann.


Resonant of nineteenth-century village tales and of such authors as Adalbert Stifter and her contemporary Robert Walser, the stories in The Country Road are largely set in the Swiss countryside. In these tales, the archaic and the modern collide. In one story, a young woman on an exhausting country walk recoils at a passing bicyclist but accepts a ride from a wagon, taking her seat on a trunk with a snake coiled inside. Death is everywhere in her work. As Ullmann writes, “sometimes the whole world appears to be painted on porcelain, right down to the dangerous cracks.” This delicate but fragile beauty, with its ominous undertones, gives Regina Ullmann her unique voice.     


“A pure and noble poetic talent: everything is full of mystery.”— Herman Hesse


“To read your book for me is such a multiplicity of joys that I can only gradually cope with it.”— Rainer Maria Rilke (in a letter to Regina Ullmann)


“Regina Ullmann has a sense of authenticity and a touch of genius.”— Robert Musil

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