Tom Moynihan - This intriguing collection of what qualifies as perfection covers quite the array of topics. From the perfect pour of a pint and the perfect age to propose to the shape of the perfect face and the telling of the perfect joke

Perfect: The Encyclopedia of Perfection
Tom Moynihan, Perfect: The Encyclopedia of Perfection, Adams Media, 2012.
read it at Google Books


What is perfect?Now that is the perfect question.
It's a 300 if you're at the bowling alley. A 2400 if you're taking the SATs. And firm with a warm, red center if you order your steak medium-rare.
While the execution of perfection depends on the subject in question, the result is always the same—complete satisfaction. This intriguing collection of what qualifies as perfection covers quite the array of topics. From the perfect pour of a pint and the perfect age to propose to the shape of the perfect face and the telling of the perfect joke, you will be pleasantly surprised by the scope of perfection.
Simply put—it's Perfect.


Behind the pristine, pale blue hardcover of this properly clever guide Perfect: The Encyclopedia of Perfection, author Tom Moynihan provides his own witty advice on mastering a multitude of tasks, identifying the ideal features of any object, and generally being brilliant. Whether you're delivering a handshake, taking a penalty kick, preparing a cup of tea, de-skunking your dog, telling a joke, or searching for skiing snow, this manual has you covered with step-by-step instructions and thoughtful insights on the topic. Equipped with expert knowledge on everything from pouring champagne to taking a vacation, you'll be a flawless force to be reckoned with!

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