Thinking Horror Volume 1: A Journal of Horror Philosophy - this is going to be about horror itself, its philosophical mechanics, about how it interacts with us, and we with it


Thinking Horror Volume 1: A Journal of Horror Philosophy,  TKHR, 2015.                          


THINKING HORROR: a Journal of Horror Philosophy is a nonfiction journal devoted to modern and contemporary horror literature consisting of essays, editorials, and in-depth interviews. The journal will be focused on the contexts and concepts of horror fiction. Unlike other markets, it’s going to eschew the regular columns you’re used to—no news, no promotional fluff pieces, no reviews. Instead, this is going to be about horror itself, its philosophical mechanics, about how it interacts with us, and we with it. Each volume of the journal will focus on a single theme, the first of which is Horror in the Twenty-First Century featuring interviews with Nate Southard, Molly Tanzer, Simon Strantzas, Michael Kelly, Nathan Ballingrud, and Silvia Moreno-Garcia and essays by Kurt Fawver, Gary Fry, Helen Marshall, Jeremy R. Smith, Andrew P. Williams, and Michael Cisco.




Replete with lengthy, thoughtful interviews, as well as critical and philosophical analyses, THINKING HORROR is exactly the type of journal I have been craving for a very long time. With the exception of one entry (the philosophy of which nearly shattered my brainpan), I found the contents to be highly informative and intellectually stimulating. In other words, consumable for someone such as myself who typically shies away from critical texts. The standout entry for me was “Why Weird, Why Now?” by Kurt Fawver, which examines the resurgence of weird fiction and does so brilliantly. It alone is worth the price of admission, and is certainly a text I shall revisit. As stated above, there are numerous Paris Review-style interviews, all of which shed an engaging light on Horror as it exists today, and where it might be heading in the future. All in all, this inaugural volume is a grand success. I’m already pining for volume two. - C.M. Muller    

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Daniel Y. Harris has composed a wild poetic drama through realms of eros and spirituality. His writing is simultaneously playful and profound, transmuting ancient symbols and concepts into a contemporary wisdom, heretofore unknown in poetry

James Reich - Giving voice to one of the most enigmatic characters in the literary canon, Reich presents meticulous and controversial solutions to the origins, mystery and messianic deterioration of Mistah Kurtz: company man, elephant man, poet, feral god

Anne Boyer - a book of mostly lyric prose about the conditions that make literature almost impossible. It holds a life story without a life, a lie spread across low-rent apartment complexes, dreamscapes, and information networks, tangled in chronology, landing in a heap of the future impossible