Eduardo Costa is a leading conceptual artist, the co-author of the very first manifesto of conceptualism. The ultimate goal of his actions and words is to think, analytically and ironically. Costa is both serious and witty, and his work possesses gravitas and lightness






Eduardo Costa, Conceptualism and Other Fictions: The Collected Writings of Eduardo Costa, 1965–2015, Ed. by Patrick Greaney, Trans. by Jen Hofer and John Pluecker, Les Figues Press, 2015.


Eduardo Costa is a leading conceptual artist, the co-author of the very first manifesto of conceptualism. He is someone who thinks through art. The ultimate goal of his actions and words is to think, analytically and ironically. Costa is both serious and witty, and his work possesses gravitas and lightness. Conceptualism and Other Fictions is more than a brilliant title: it’s a true and daring proposition and an urgent read. Like Duchamp, who might be Eduardo Costa’s alter ego, and whose work can’t be understood without Duchamp du signe, Costa’s work is oeuvre and writing, action and language. This book stands well as Costa du signe. I imagine Eduardo Costa like Pierre Menard, authoring time and again Conceptualism, and Duchamp, as Fictions.– Luis Pérez-Oramas


A valuable anthology that makes clear the historical importance of Eduardo Costa’s art.– Alexander Alberro


Eduardo Costa, a member of the first generation of Latin American conceptualists, gives us first hand insights into the artistic and political moment in Latin America that preceded hegemonic conceptual art. He offers us an invaluable personal document about a time that only recently has become the subject of academic study.– Luis Camnitzer


Eduardo Costa has long been interested, as Patrick Greaney writes in his introduction, in “rethinking materials and concepts of materiality.” This is where Costa joins in with the extraordinary vitality of the intellectual scene in Buenos Aires in the 1960s, its marriage of the questioning of received ideas and the liberty of experimentation. It was a scene in which friendships and collaborations were an essential element of thought, as Costa’s many co-authorships with other artists attest. Costa’s curiosity and thoughtfulness have been a feature of his writing right up to today, which makes this generous compilation so delightful.– Guy Brett


The artist Eduardo Costa was born in Buenos Aires in 1940.  He studied painting and literature and was an active participant in the multimedia experiments in the arts that centered on the Instituto Torcuato Di Tella in Buenos Aires. From 1981 to 2003, he lived in New York, where he exhibited his work and wrote for Art in America, Flash Art, and other magazines. Since 2003, he has lived in Buenos Aires. His work is in the permanent collections of Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum, the Guggenheim, Museu de Arte Moderna do Río de Janeiro, Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes (Buenos Aires), Museo de Arte Moderno de Buenos Aires, and the Fundación Jumex, among others.

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