Adam of Bremen - His History vividly reflects the firsthand accounts he received from travelers, traders, and missionaries on the peripheries of medieval Europe

History of the Archbishops of Hamburg-Bremen
Adam of Bremen, History of the Archbishops of Hamburg-Bremen, Trans. by Francis J. Tschan, Columbia University Press, 2002.
read it at Google Books
www.jstor.org/stable/10.7312/adam12574


Adam of Bremen's history of the see of Hamburg and of Christian missions in northern Europe from the late eighth to the late eleventh century is the primary source of our knowledge of the history, geography, and ethnography of the Scandinavian and Baltic regions and their peoples before the thirteenth century. Arriving in Bremen in 1066 and soon falling under the tutelage of Archbishop Adalbert, who figures prominently in the narrative, Adam recorded the centuries-long campaign by his church to convert Slavic and Scandinavian peoples. His History vividly reflects the firsthand accounts he received from travelers, traders, and missionaries on the peripheries of medieval Europe.


Adam Of Bremen, (flourished 11th century), German historian whose work on the archbishops of Hamburg-Bremen provides valuable information on German politics under the Salian emperors and is also one of the great books of medieval geography.
Of Franconian origin, he was probably educated at the cathedral school in Bamberg but was introduced in 1066 or 1067 into the cathedral chapter at Bremen by Archbishop Adalbert. In 1069 Adam was head of the Bremen cathedral school.
Adam began his Gesta Hammaburgensis ecclesiae pontificum (History of the Archbishops of Hamburg-Bremen), comprising four books, after Adalbert’s death (1072). In Book III a candid and vivid description of the archbishop’s personality and activities leads to an account of the German political affairs of the time. Book IV gives a “description of the islands of the north,” and besides dealing with Russia, the countries of the Baltic peoples, Scandinavia, Iceland, and Greenland, Adam makes the earliest known reference to Vinland, that part of North America reached by Leif Eriksson.
- www.britannica.com/biography/Adam-of-Bremen#ref191702

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